Justin Theroux on Why He Loves Patti Levin

Did you find yourself sympathizing with Patti Levin after Sunday's episode? You're not alone—actor Justin Theroux shares your emotional 180:

"When the penny dropped for me as far as what she is, that she's essentially a child, it was just heartbreaking. Immediately you can love Patti for the first time. It was an incredible piece of writing. You realize that she's not this nonsensical, heartless bitch—there is a reason why she doesn't speak, a reason why she wants people to die. It's because she's emotionally handicapped by what's been done to her by others. She's essentially a villain for 18 episodes, and then she becomes the most endearing character—at least for me—of all two seasons. I just loved those scenes in the well and thought it was such an incredible, inventive turn."
The Divine Comedy of Virgil and Kevin

The Divine Comedy of Virgil and Kevin

“You were the lamp that led me from that night/You led me forth to drink Parnassian water/then on the road to God you shed your light.”
—Statius to Virgil, Purgatorio 22.64-65

Written by Dante Aligheri in the 14th Century, The Divine Comedy is an epic poem considered to be one of the most defining pieces of literature about our ideas of hell and the underworld. Drawing heavily from the medieval Christian philosophies and theology of Thomas Aquinas’s Summa Theologica, the poem is divided into three sections, which are the three realms of the dead—hell, purgatory, and paradise. In the epic, Dante is guided through the various circles of hell and purgatory before reaching paradise. He has a wise guide throughout the journey. That guide’s name was...Virgil. Of course, it’s no coincidence that this is the name of the man who has offered to guide Kevin into the realms of death to do battle with his “most powerful adversary.” I would suggest that Virgil’s suicide was not a devious act of narcissism but that he killed himself to act as Kevin’s guide to the world that awaited him.

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‘Orange Sticker’: By the Babylon Motel

‘Orange Sticker’: By the Babylon Motel

"By the rivers of Babylon, we sat down and cried
as we remembered Zion.
We hung our lyres on willow trees. …
How could we sing the Lord’s song in a foreign land?"

—Psalm 137

"Oh, give thanks to the Lord, for He is good!
For His mercy endures forever."

—Psalm 136

In Edenic Jarden, there's an orange sticker on the houses of those who have been certified as the safe/chosen/spared. Like the Israelites, those who live in Jarden are the Chosen People. But once you get in John Murphy’s pickup truck, cross the mythical bridge out of town and descend through the hostile, murmuring mass of the wannabe citizens of the Miraculous city, it gets…well, we already know Jarden’s not safe, but then there's Babylon. 

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Damon Lindelof Teases Episode 4: ‘Kevin Gets Rick-Rolled’

We’ve met the Murphy family, seen how the Garvey-Durst clan made it to Miracle and checked in with the happenings of Laurie and Tommy. So what’s up in Episode 4 of The Leftovers second season? Series co-creator Damon Lindelof teases the episode, titled “Orange Sticker,” cryptically by teasing: “Kevin gets rick-rolled.”

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The Cast Breaks Down the Garveys’ Big Move

The Cast Breaks Down the Garveys’ Big Move

The yin to the Season 2 premiere’s yang, the second episode “A Matter of Geography,” documented how the Garvey family went from Mapleton to Miracle. Watching The Leftovers chatted with the show’s cast at the red carpet premiere about the episode’s action, enticing stars Carrie Coon, Justin Theroux and Margaret Qualley weigh in on what’s up with Nora, Kevin, Jill and the Garvey family as a whole.

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The Secrets Garden: Axis Mundi

The Secrets Garden: Axis Mundi

Watching the Season 2 premiere, I see again a major theme returning from Season 1: secrets, secret-keeping and truth-telling.

Police Chief Kevin Garvey and his family spend Season 1 navigating the post-Sudden Departure world. Those “leftover” in idyllic Mapleton must decide whether to face what they are keeping secret from each other and themselves: their losses, their mistakes, their hidden guilt. Kevin is burdened with what he cannot admit or accept about his marriage and children, his fears and his spiraling violence. But we’ve seen in The Leftovers world that what is denied will return; what is buried will be unearthed.

In the Season 2 premiere, we travel to Jarden, Texas, a new Eden—jardin is Spanish for “garden”—in Miracle National Park. No one was taken from here Oct. 14, and now it’s a holy place to which pilgrims travel from around the world, looking for hope and safety.

The episode is titled “Axis Mundi.” By definition, an Axis Mundi is a world-center, where people go to encounter the gods, hear from oracles and find healing and transcendence. But there is spiritual gravity in such place: The Buddha’s Bodhi Tree, the Navajo Canyon de Chelly, Mount Sinai, Jesus’ dying hill in Jerusalem are “thin spaces,” to use the Celtic term, and the energy in thin spaces both energizes the soul and strips away attachment and illusion. Flawed human beings can’t stay in Eden. The earth under Jarden is quaking, as it did with the Adam-less Eve in the episode’s prologue. And things are already disappearing: children—and swimming holes.

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