Justin Theroux on Why He Loves Patti Levin

Did you find yourself sympathizing with Patti Levin after Sunday's episode? You're not alone—actor Justin Theroux shares your emotional 180:

"When the penny dropped for me as far as what she is, that she's essentially a child, it was just heartbreaking. Immediately you can love Patti for the first time. It was an incredible piece of writing. You realize that she's not this nonsensical, heartless bitch—there is a reason why she doesn't speak, a reason why she wants people to die. It's because she's emotionally handicapped by what's been done to her by others. She's essentially a villain for 18 episodes, and then she becomes the most endearing character—at least for me—of all two seasons. I just loved those scenes in the well and thought it was such an incredible, inventive turn."

A Look Back: The Garvey-Durst Family & Kevin’s Relationship with Patti Levin

Co-creator Damon Lindelof has offered a tease for the second episode of Season 2, but how else to prepare for the coming hour? Here’s a thought: Watch these two short videos—the latest in our The Leftovers: A Look Back series—which find Lindelof catching you back up on a couple older storylines that will be crucial in “A Matter of Geography.”

The first takes a look at how the new Garvey-Durst family came to be, while the second looks at Kevin’s relationship with Patti Levin. Watch them both after the jump.

Read More
The Leftovers Season 2: 5 Juicy Details (And More!) Revealed

The Leftovers Season 2: 5 Juicy Details (And More!) Revealed

At the 2015 Television Critics Association summer press tour on Thursday in Los Angeles, details about the upcoming season of The Leftovers trickled out. Co-creators Damon Lindelof and Tom Perrotta appeared on stage with cast members Justin Theroux, Carrie Coon and new season regular Regina King to take questions from television reporters.

In top-line summary, to kick off Season 2, Kevin and Jill Garvey—along with Nora and the baby she found abandoned on the Garveys’ doorstep—move to Jarden, Texas, a town remarkable for its zero departures. Also in town are Matt and Mary Jamison, looking for a miracle of their own.

According to an on-the-scene report from The Hollywood Reporter, Lindelof stressed that Season 2 is not a reboot but rather “the next chapter.” Lindelof stood by the tone of the first season, reported USA Today. “We always want the show to feel authentic,” he told the crowd. “We wanted to ground the world. [It] may have felt bleak and despairing, but to us it felt honest.” The showrunner maintained his sense of humor, joking at one point about wanting “to tape Season 2 before a live studio audience—we wanted to opt in for a laugh track.”

All jokes aside, Lindelof suggested a more positive current running through the new season, which was announced as premiering Oct. 4. “It was important to us that the characters didn't want to feel that way,” Lindelof said, according to USA Today. “The idea of people wanting to feel better, particularly this family, [they] wouldn't want to stay in the places they were, either geographically or emotionally.”

So—apart from the change in scenery—what else can you expect from the new season? Here are five juicy bits Lindelof and Co. revealed during the panel discussion.

Read More
Cast and Creators Detail 6 Reasons The Leftovers Caught Their Attention

Cast and Creators Detail 6 Reasons The Leftovers Caught Their Attention

On June 7, the cast and creators of The Leftovers took a break from filming Season 2—now in production near Austin—to gather for a panel discussion at the Austin Television Festival. Writer and co-creator Damon Lindelof, director and executive producer Mimi Leder and three cast members—Ann Dowd, Christopher Eccleston and Carrie Coon—looked back on their experience shooting the show’s first season.

Read More
Smoke, Smoke, Smoke That Cigarette…

Smoke, Smoke, Smoke That Cigarette…

The Leftovers is leaving many viewers with more questions than answers. Last Sunday’s episode, “The Garveys at Their Best,” certainly offered some solace for the bewildered by using flashbacks to Oct. 13 and the morning of Oct. 14 three years ago, just before the Departure. But the question of why the Guilty Remnant are incessantly puffing on cigarettes remains an enigma that’s tough to unravel.

Read More
9 Excellent Reasons to Binge The Leftovers' 9 Episodes Before the Finale

9 Excellent Reasons to Binge The Leftovers' 9 Episodes Before the Finale

It’s time to binge on some Leftovers: On Sunday, Aug. 30, starting at noon, HBO2 will air the first nine episodes the series’ inaugural season back-to-back so that fans can re-watch or new folks can catch-up in advance of the drama’s Sept. 7 season finale. (Of course, you can binge anytime on HBO GO.)

To tee you up before the coming marathon, I assembled nine great reasons (warning: some are a tad cheeky) anyone – everyone! – should go back and watch The Leftovers’ first nine episodes again…or to binge watch and catch up on the show that’s gotten everyone else talking.

Read More
3 Reasons the 'Cairo' Cabin Could All Be a Setup

3 Reasons the 'Cairo' Cabin Could All Be a Setup

As we saw in "Cairo," Kevin has gotten himself into the middle of a serious morality crisis. Heck, it could even be existential, given the circumstances of Grandpa Garvey coming to recruit him into some heavenly cause. But, given that he’s dealing with Patti now, after all, there was something amiss. Did you feel it, too? The slight uncertainty that…not all is as it seems? Of course you did. This is The Leftovers we're talking about. And it all falls on the Guilty Remnant, a group that, as we've seen, will do anything to keep their plans running smoothly.

Read More

Director Michelle MacLaren Breaks Down Character Moments From 'Cairo'

A veteran of Breaking Bad and Game of Thrones, director Michelle MacLaren is no stranger to suspense. Most recently, MacLaren brought her expertise to "Cairo," an episode of The Leftovers she calls "a big turning point and a challenging dramatic piece." The acclaimed director connected with WatchingTheLeftovers.com to discuss her take on the hour's main characters, and how she integrated her interpretation into the episode's aesthetic.

MacLaren goes into greater detail about six notable shots from "Cairo."

Read More
The 3 Abrahams in ‘Cairo’

The 3 Abrahams in ‘Cairo’

Genesis 22 tells the story of God testing Abraham. God’s test consists of Abraham taking his son, Isaac, to Mount Mariah where he is to sacrifice him and then burn his body on an altar. Abraham does as he’s instructed. He makes the journey, lays his son on the altar, and raises a knife to end Isaac’s life. But before he can bring the blade down, an angel grabs Abraham’s hand and stops him from completing the deed. The point of the story is meant to demonstrate Abraham’s commitment to God and his faith.

I saw this scene play out with three different Abrahams and three different commitments in the latest episode of The Leftovers, “Cairo.”

Read More
3 Biblical Prophetic Warnings in ‘Guest’

3 Biblical Prophetic Warnings in ‘Guest’

I’ve already offered some theories about who could be The Leftovers’ true prophet. But what other biblical, prophetic clues were in “Guest”? Here are three big prophetic references I noticed – with a little guessing about what they could mean.

Read More
Of Wolves and Charlatans: The Lurking Savagery of the Post-Departure World

Of Wolves and Charlatans: The Lurking Savagery of the Post-Departure World

The increasing futility and potential danger of clutching to pre-Departure symbols and institutions seems to be at the heart of The Leftovers, leaving each character in the position of establishing a new identity atop a barely concealed set of volatile, more primitive emotions. In Episode 1, Chief Garvey storms out of a pre-parade city council meeting with the warning that “Everyone’s ready to f**kin’ explode.” In Episode 2, the police department-mandated psychiatrist Kevin is ordered to see explains the presence of a blow-up penguin sitting in his office. The psychiatrist offers that, in his dealings with children, they often need an outlet toward which to redirect their aggression, so they attack the penguin. The penguin exists solely as the recipient of abuse, and the necessity of its presence suggests a lingering psychological problem in the patient – a benchmark for how much aggression still remains. The title, “Penguin one, Us Zero” suggests that the community is beginning to redirect its aggression toward the mysterious and ephemeral nature of the rapture at objects of convenience who do not fight back and who exist to be hurt. The community’s lack of acceptance for the mysteries of their universe and the rise of their latent aggression is evident in the character of Matt.

Read More